Waterford Henry Jordan Private Cemetery Memorial Inscriptions



Henry Jordan's Private Cemetery, Waterford West, Logan City


Address: Abelia Drive, Waterford West, Logan City
Opened: approx. 1872
# graves: none visible when visited.

Henry Jordan's Private Cemetery, Abelia Drive, Waterford West

Henry Jordan purchased the former Pimlico township - in July 1869 and commenced construction of a sugar mill. His property became known as Tygum Plantation. Jordan had been the emigration agent for Queensland in Britain and was responsible for the many Lancashire cotton workers coming to Queensland and the Logan. From 1868-71 he was the East Moreton representative in the Queensland Legislative Assembly. He was then involved in journalism and sugar growing. The first crushing at his Tygum sugar mill occurred in 1870.

The Jordan family was plagued with personal tragedy during their time at Tygum, with the death of baby Hamilton aged 4 days in October 1872. Twins Nathaniel and Winifred were born in February 1874, with Nathaniel living only 2½ months and Winifred living fourteen months. Another baby boy, Turner Shaw, was born a few days after Winifred.s death, and he only survived eleven months. All of these children were buried on the property in an area now designated as a cemetery. By that time Jordan had subdivided the property, and sold Tygum House to William Arthy.

William Arthy was a music teacher for the Education Department. His son James was a surveyor, who worked in north Queensland. James returned home suffering from consumption and died at Tygum on 10 October 1886. William died on 22 July 1888. Both men are buried in this cemetery. It is possible that there are other burials on the site, of people who worked on Jordan's plantation.

This cemetery site was surveyed at the time of the subdivision of the estate in 1878 and was marked by a large fig tree that recently died and was removed by the Logan City Council Parks Department in 2004.

A large Moreton Bay fig tree originally marked the site of the Jordan Family cemetery at the end of Abelia Drive. Unfortunately the tree died and had to be removed. Tygum House is believed to have been on the hill overlooking this site. It was a low white bungalow with wide verandas and green shutters surrounded by beautiful gardens. Henry Jordan was Agent-General for Queensland in London and actively encouraged migration to Queensland. He was later a member of the Queensland Parliament. The private cemetery here is the resting place for four of Henry Jordan s infants, as well the subsequent owner of the estate, William Arthy and his son James. Graves date between 1872 and 1888.
[Extracted from Logan City links below]

Henry Jordan Park

Henry Jordan provided work for Irish farmers settling in the area.

The Moreton Bay Fig, Ficus macrophylla, planted more than 100 years ago on this site graces the unmarked graves of William Arthy (1889) and his son James Arthy(1886).

The tree also marks the location of Henry Jordan's Tygum House once occupied by the Arthy's. The surrounding land, once known as Tygum Pocket was owned by Henry Jordan.

Large Bunya Pines, Alaucaria biowilla, still stand on entering Tygum Road and mark the former entrance to this property.

Used for cane farming, Henry Jordan provided work for Irish farmers settling in the area. They were commonly known as Jordan's Pets. The farm also helped support a nearby sugar mill. Henry Jordan brought further recognition to the area when representing Brisbane in the first Queensland Parliment of 1859.

Today part of this land is set aside as park under the trusteeship of Logan City Council for the benefit of the community and protection of its heritage.

[from the plaque at Henry Jordan Park]

More information about
Logan City Cemetery Lists
Jordan Family Cemetery, Waterford West including burial register.
Logan - final resting places.

Photographed: 12 Feb 2006


Displayed images are scaled down to fit on the screen, but full-size images can be obtained by clicking.


All the photos,
Names in alphabetical order,
All the cemeteries